Jed Cohen

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How Do You Do, Squidoo?

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One of the pretty very interesting people I follow on Twitter is Susan Villas Lewis.  I started following her because someone (I forget who) tweeted about her job search.  Instead of going out and submitting resumes, Susan decided to hire a boss.  Which I think is awesome.  It’s an amazing, creative spin on the often frustrating job hunt and something I wish I had thought of myself – although I don’t have anywhere near the kind of qualifications Susan has.  Anyway, a few days ago she tweeted about this internship at Squidoo with Megan Casey, the Squidoo Editor-in-Chief.  Seeing as to how my internship with Careerealism is ending soon, I’ve decided to go ahead and apply.

You know, it’s kind of funny that through my college career, when people often intern everywhere, I basically worked in one place.  Now that I’ve graduated, I’m applying for internships even with a full time job.

But that’s beside the point.  The point is that the application process is to create a Squidoo lens featuring what you’ve done.  So I did.  It’s all about my undergraduate degree, and it’s kind of a chronological walk through my experience at Gallatin.  Check it out (although some of the content was featured here, so it may be a bit of a repeat).

I’ve been working on it for the last few days, and it was an interesting experience.  Any Squidoo lens consists of a series of modules, and you can mix and match modules to create the layout you want.  It’s an interesting system, kind of a mixture of blogging and outside sources of content.  I was able to tie in videos, photos, and Amazon listings into the lens, and it’s that last bit that is particularly interesting.

Squidoo’s revenue is split, 45% to the company, 5% to charity, and 50% to the writer.  And it’s across your lens, so it includes Amazon referrals and Google ad revenue.  I like that they let you donate everything to charity (which is what I’ve done).  I also see the potential for spam – don’t you?

Overall, creating the lens was quite a fascinating and reflective experience, even if I’m not selected for the internship.  I also wonder how many people have joined Squidoo in hopes of landing a position (by the way, Megan commented on the internship announcement saying they’ve already received 50 submissions, so this ought to be interesting), so from that perspective alone I find this interesting.

Do you use Squidoo?  If so, how?  I’m going to start working on another lens soon, but I need some ideas.  Leave a comment and let me know what you think I should write on!

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August 6th, 2009 at 10:05 pm

The Dynamics of Scheduling

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One of the common assignments during NYU Stern undergraduate classes is some kind of group project in the hopes that repeated group work will better prepare you for the corporate world.  Which makes sense.  It also allowes students to work on a more meaningful, larger project over the course of one semester than they would have been able to complete by themselves – such as developing an entire international marketing plan or creating a marketing strategy for a new product from scratch.  It’s also an opportunity to meet some people you might not have met otherwise. Yet for Stern students (and those of us non-Stern students lucky enough to beg/borrow/steal our way into Stern classes), these group projects come with one big disadvantage – having to schedule seemingly endless group meetings. Read the rest of this entry »

Written by Jed

June 6th, 2009 at 11:11 am

The Role of Propaganda in Modern Democracy (aka My Colloquium)

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So school’s out; I’ve graduated.  Yipee.  This has naturally led me to think about quite a few things and to reflect upon some of my experiences at NYU.  I’ve written before on the wide range of classes I’ve taken and some of the opportunities afforded to me by my academic program at the Gallatin School of Individualized Study.  One of the few degree requirements (and as such one of the few guaranteed shared experiences among the students) is the colloquium.  The colloquium is Gallatin’s senior capstone, a two hour discussion on a topic of the students choice with three faculty members.  It is something that students look upon with a bit of dread, and it is a bit daunting – it is rare for a student’s academic career to hinge on a single event like the colloquium (not that many people fail, but it is still stressful).

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May 30th, 2009 at 11:20 am

New Media, New Politics and the Future of Democracy

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Over the course of my college career, I’ve taken classes across NYU; I’ve studied marketing in the Stern School of Business, politics in the College of Arts and Sciences, communication theory in the Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development, and public service in the Wagner School of Public Service. But quite possibly one of the most intriguing academic opportunities I’ve had has been the chance to take a number of tutorials within Gallatin. Tutorials are group independent projects – two to five students will spend the semester working together and with a professor of their choice to examine an issue or topic they find interesting. It’s a pretty unique opportunity to study almost anything you want to. During my time at Gallatin, I’ve had the opportunity to take three tutorials. The first two took place during my junior year; they were focused on social marketing, and ultimately led to the creation of “Are You Sustainable?,” a pilot project designed to promote environmental sustainability at NYU. The project ultimately fell apart for a variety of reasons, but it was quite an interesting experince nonetheless.

The third tutorial I’ve participated in has taken place during this semester. It’s title is the rather abmbitious “New Politics, New Media, and the Future of Democracy” (then again the first two were the equally ambitious “Advertising Democracy I and II). We’ve been focusing on the role of the Internet and other information and communication technologies (ICT) on politics, and over the course of the semester we’ve examined a number of diverse topics including the role of new media during the 2004 Howard Dean presidential campaign and President Obama’s campaign (and his first 100 days in office), network theory, and the role of ICT in civil conflict.  Anyway, the whole point of this post is to discuss the class website, http://newmediatutorial.wordpress.com – it’s the place to go to read some of our work and take a look at what we’ve been working on.  Also, if you go back far enough, you can even see some of videos taken from class discussions at the beginning of the semester.

Written by Jed

April 26th, 2009 at 10:02 am

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