Jed Cohen

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Threadsy

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I wish I could go to more social media events/conferences/festivals/whatever.  Sadly, my schedule is a bit tight, and I don’t live on the west coast.

I stumbled across Threadsy via Twitter (the opening comment makes sense when you consider that Threadsy launched at Techcruch 50).  Anyway, it looks interesting, and I signed up for a beta invite.  Then, because they asked, I started filling out their survey.  In addition to the usual demographic information, they asked “How would you improve email, Twitter, or Facebook?”

Before I post my response, I should note that I don’t have access to Threadsy now.  And I didn’t write this post because I want an invite faster.  Don’t get me wrong, I do want to try it out, but I wrote this post because they made me think.  So way to go them – in my eyes, that’s as important as providing a service I’ll actually use.

Now here’s my response to their survey question:

I think Threadsy is a good way to start. With the rise of Twitter clients (especially those that can integrate with other services), we now have an expectation that not everyone will view social media content the same way – that way being through the service’s website. Opening up the data stream across platforms and allowing third party applications to access, sort, and analyze it can help to increase the signal to noise ratio, and make sure that we’re seeing content we actually want to see.

I suppose this mirrors the original development of e-mail clients, especially when you consider that they often include additional features beyond that of what e-mail services provide (like better spam filtering).

This said, it’s interesting to note that nothing above truly changes the concept of e-mail – although that may be just what it needs considering that it’s been around since the 1970s. And if I knew how to completely revamp e-mail, well, I’d probably be off trying to do it.

So yeah.  That’s what popped into my brain in response to their question (and I didn’t even go into Google Wave).  I’m still thinking about this, but I’m also curious – how would you make e-mail better?

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September 16th, 2009 at 10:06 am

That Didn’t Go As Planned

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Okay, so the whole #140conf seven posts in seven days bit obviously hasn’t happened.  I really shouldn’t promise something a) in the heat of the moment and b) when I can’t set aside the time to complete it.

I apologize to you, the few people who read this.  I have some of the #140conf posts as drafts; hopefully I’ll be able to finish and publish them in the coming weeks.

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June 25th, 2009 at 7:20 pm

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The Power of Fantasy in an Age of Reality

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This is the second of my #140conf seven posts in seven days series.  Of course, this was supposed to be done on Friday (it’s now Sunday), so I have a bit of catching up to do.  For those of you that haven’t read the first post of this series, I’m going to write a post a day for the next week reflecting on some aspect of the 140 Characters Conference (except today, when I hope to write three to catch up).  The posts may be direct responses to the panels, commentary on the event, or something only tangentially related.  I’m not really too sure on what I’ll be covering each day, as I’m writing them shortly before I post them.  So what’s on the agenda right now?  The power of fantasy in an age of reality.  Also known as why fake people on Twitter can sometimes be more real than actual human beings. Read the rest of this entry »

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June 21st, 2009 at 5:52 pm

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Perceptions of the Impact of Social Media

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So this is the first of my #140conf seven posts in seven days series.  For those of you that haven’t read my previous post, I’m going to write a post a day for the next week reflecting on some aspect of the 140 Characters Conference.  The posts may be direct responses to the panels, commentary on the event, or something only tangentially related.  I’m not really too sure on what I’ll be covering each day, as I’m writing them shortly before I post them.  So what’s on the agenda today?  How the perceived impact of social media can differ from reality.

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June 19th, 2009 at 12:08 am

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Reflecting on #140conf

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So I went to The 140 Characters Conference.  Put on by Jeff Pulver, it was a two day conference dedicated to all things Twitter; you might remember it from some of my earlier posts.  I actually tweeted most of the conference from my phone, as I didn’t feel like carrying around my laptop for the two days.  My thumbs may have suffered some kind of repetitive strain injury as a result, but that’s okay.  If you’d like too, you can search for my tweets from the last two days to get a sense of what it was like to be there – that’s part of why I was tweeting at least.  Anyway, what follows are some of my thoughts about #140conf (as the kids on Twitter call it).  My apologies if I slip into twit-speak that you’re not familiar with – after two days spent in 140 characters, it’s might be a bit hard to get used to as much room as I want.

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June 18th, 2009 at 12:05 am

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140 Characters Conference Update

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Don’t think I posted this here, but courtesy of Jeff Pulver’s scholarship program, I’ll be attending the 140 Characters Conference next month (you can read my application here).  So excited!  It’s going to be great to meet some of the people who I follow on Twitter and learn and talk about the uses of Twitter across different fields.  I can’t wait!

EDIT: The badge no longer works due to changes at the 140conf website.  Sorry folks.

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May 23rd, 2009 at 11:47 am

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Why I’d like to attend #140conf

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So Jeff Pulver is putting together a conference called #140conf in celebration of all things Twitter.  As a recent college grad (try today, actually), I’m not exactly able to sign up and just go.  But Jeff has generosity decided to run a program giving scholarships to 30 people who wouldn’t otherwise be able to attend.  The entry process?  Write a 140 word e-mail on why I want to attend.

So here it is:

Hello Jeff-
 
I’d like to attend #140conf because I think that one day Twitter is going to revolutionize the way that companies interact with their customers (if it hasn’t already), and as a recent college graduate – commencement was yesterday in fact – I think that what I could learn at #140conf will be invaluable in my career.  I’m also extremely interested in the political applications of Twitter; it seems like every week I find some new way that a government across the world is using Twitter to open itself to its constituents.  I’d really appreciate having the opportunity to attend #140conf in order to explore this (and more).
 
Also, to be perfectly honest, the idea of spending two whole days talking about Twitter kind of appeals to my inner geek.
 
Thank you,
Jed Cohen

For kicks, I decided to write a Twitter version that’s 140 characters long:

Jeff-
Because I graduated from college today and think that one day Twitter is going to revolutionize the way I’ll work.
Thanks,
Jed Cohen

And finally, my tweet linking to this post (for bonus points apparently).

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May 13th, 2009 at 11:35 am

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The New Yorker Summit

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I went to The New Yorker Summit today.  It was pretty great.  The Summit began with a keynote by Malcolm Gladwell, and then featured panels focused around three areas – “The Economy and Financial Markets”; “Priorities: Health, Education, Energy, and the Environment”; and “Foreign Policy: Defense and Diplomacy.”  Gladwell started the day discussing the problem with experts – how experts in a given field (he used the financial markets) are much more likely to both be miscalibrated when it comes to their own skills and knowledge and suffer from the illusion that they control random events.  This did set the tone a bit for the rest of the day (which I suppose is what a good keynote should do), but the conversations ranged across many topics.  My favorites included Nassim Taleb and Robert Shiller’s panel on the economic crisis; Geoffrey Canada’s talk on how to create scalable, lasting educational programs for disadvantaged children; and Seymour Hersch’s conversation with David Remnick on foreign policy and some of the scary things he knows.  But don’t just take it from me – why don’t you read The New Yorker’s coverage of………itself.  How very meta.

Anyway, maybe more later after it all sinks in and I have a chance to review my notes?

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May 5th, 2009 at 11:33 pm

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